Rejected

I got my first rejection letter.

It was a positive experience I think. It is something any serious author experiences, something that I will likely experience frequently in the future. It also pointed out flaws in my own work and places where I can improve both my book and my pitch for future submissions. Now it is time to regroup and apply some new steam to get more submissions out into the world and find the right home for my novel.

Onwards and upwards!

Updates on Writing

Well I’ve fallen by the wayside a bit with my writing, once again. Busy work days + a new early schedule have caused me to poop out at about 10 pm most nights, so I haven’t had much time at all for writing.

I’m hoping to get some done this weekend, even if only a little. I’m working on my various short fiction, but also editing my novel. Since I’m likely going to try and submit my book for traditional publishing, I’m trying to get it up to a nice standard. Whenever that time comes to submit it, I’ll then be able to wholly focus on short fiction. I’m trying to get my next anthology out by year’s end if possible.

In the mean time, Across the Battlefield is free all weekend on Amazon, and I’ve already had nearly 20 downloads this morning alone, so that bodes well for the rest of the weekend!

Write on!

I’ve been getting some awesome feedback on my newest project, Darkness on Daen, and am now into writing the second part of the novella. I’m also now updating and streamlining my blog, trying to get it into a cleaner state. One great thing I’ve noticed is that my traffic has gone up quite a bit in the past week, thanks in large part to posting a link to Darkness on Daen, Part I, on Reddit.

While more commonly associate with general news and interesting stories, Reddit hosts a decently large Writing subreddit (about 5,000 users) and a much smaller, but heavily used Keep Writing subreddit which urges people to post their work and review the work of others who have also posted.

I’ve also found that I’ve been getting more than a few hits of people who are finding my book reviews on search engines, so I’m hoping to get that process going again to keep adding to my review section. I will be posting the first short story from my next entry in the World Conflict’s anthology series, so pay attention to updates this week if you are interested in checking it out.

Now I’m off, to bed. Happy writings!

It’s been 1 year…

Ok, I know this sounds like the beginning of a Barenaked Ladies song, but it’s not.

I was sitting in bed tonight, editing Scope’s War ( I’m almost done with rewrites through Ch. 13 ) when I looked up at the date on my computer. I realized with a start that tomorrow, Jan. 17, 2013 will be the 1 year mark of releasing Across the Battlefield.

It seems incredible to me that it has already been one year since I put forth my first publication. Since then, I’ve been featured in a couple flash fiction anthologies, with one more on the way, finished my first novel, and started several other short fiction project, including a followup to Across the Battlefield. Despite the difficulties of life the past year, which included changing jobs and nearly losing my brother-in-law to horrific surgery complications, I seem to have come out on top of it all.

So I’d like to extend a big thank you to everyone who follows my blog and my work. Thank you to all my online friends and networking buddies who have helped get Across the Battlefield up to over 100 likes on Amazon and have convinced me that this is what I should continue to write and focus on this part of my life.

Most of all, I have to thank my amazing wife and my family, who are constantly encouraging and have pushed me on more than one occasion to keep going even when I felt like giving up.

So cheers and happy writing to you all. Let’s make this year better than last!

January Writing

Hey Everyone,

   It’s been quite a while since my last post. Work and life have been busy and taken a major toll on my writing. The holidays are always busy, and unfortunately I wasn’t able to find much time to write during the past month or so.  I am, however, in the process of editing Scope’s War. I’ve gone through the first 6 chapters of revisions, rereading my work and changing some character arcs, dropping and adding new characters, and making the overall timeline of the book flow more naturally. If I stay on this pace, my hope is to have first round rewrites and edits done sometime next month. Then it will be time to pull out the red pen and do the serious text editing and grammar checking. My goal is to get Scope’s War onto Amazon sometime this summer, hopefully by June, but if it happens earlier than that, so much the better. In the meantime, I’m going to be putting together a small group of test readers to read through the first 3 or 4 chapters of Scope’s War. I’d like to get an idea of how people relate to the story, the world, and the characters. If you’re interested, you can send me a message via Facebook on my Author Page. Once Scope’s War is done, I’ll be starting to work on Scope’s Redemption, the follow up book. I’m planning on the story only being a duology, rather than the traditional trilogy. I’m also going to resume work on Sands of Eternity, the alternate history / time travel novel that was my first project when I started out writing. I put about 41k words into it before I shelved it to work on Scope’s War, but my hope is to finish that up in the next year or so. I leave you, now, with an excerpt from Scope’s War. The passage below is a brief glimpse into the history of America just before the birth of our protagonist. Enjoy and, as always, happy writing!

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   The Northern War, of which he father’s friends had spoken, arrived just on the heel of the Southern War with Mexico. The city of Vancouver, in western Canada, had defected and given over control of their city and surrounding territory to the Pacific Territory Authorities, specifically to the city government of Seattle, its citizens tired of a government whose main focus was on the eastern half of the nation. The result of the United States accepting the Canadian city was that rather than gaining territory, and the economic boon the city offered, the United States once again found itself at war with a neighbor. The American military was pushed back almost a hundred miles along a northern border simply too large to adequately defend. Garrisons along the northern border stripped of their core commands to fight the Mexicans in the south found themselves outnumbered and outgunned. In the end, Canada stopped short of a full-scale invasion, content to keep what it had conquered as the United Nations stepped in to put a stop to the fighting. America lost nearly twelve percent of their continental holdings in what amounted to a Canadian blitzkrieg that couldn’t be answered.

Flash Fiction, Feb. 5

Just dropping in with another short flash fiction I’ve written for IndiesUnlimited.  I’ve been making sure to stay up on them and have been making a collection of flash fiction from various competitions which I plan to publish at some point in the future.  I find I have a weakness for this type of writing. It is a really great way to get some thought on paper and just see where it takes you without being worried about how long it will be. These particular last few are also great exercises in word choice and flow. Only having 250 words to make a convincing story work is not an easy task and it teaches you to really weed out the superfluous part and just stick with the story. So here is my latest, entry, for everyone’s reading pleasure!

The Boy in the Ship

The boy listened to the swell of the surf upon the distant shore, trying to block out his fear and uncertainty of what was coming. The ship was rocking gently as it ghosted into the harbor. The boy peered through the gloom of the galley. It was dark, as it had been every day since he had entered the great, gaping belly of the wooden ship. The stench no longer impressed him, so long had it filled his nostrils.

The sharp call of a seagull caused him to start. It was an unfamiliar sound, for the strange birds did not exist in his homeland. He peered through a crack between the boards near where he sat, watching as the ship slid alongside the docks. He could see ropes being thrown down to those on the ground, who quickly fastened them to the huge logs planted in the water.

A long board suddenly appear just on the edge of the boy’s vision. It was lowered to touch the dock and two of the men who sailed the ship descended. He watched as the fat one handed the skinny one a piece of cloth. The men had marked symbols on it, though the boy had no idea what they meant. The two were confronted by another, very stern looking, man who waved at the ship and made an inquisitive face. The skinny man simply handed him the cloth and uttered the only word in their language the boy understood.

“Slaves.”